Tags
Tab Item Content
Join Us!
Archives Meta
Archaeology by Prau...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Archaeology [Sticky] Archaeology by Prau123

1,069 Posts
12 Users
27 Reactions
1.9 M Views
Prau123 avatar
Posts: 2565
Topic starter
(@prau123)
Famed Member
Joined: 5 years ago

 

 

Who were the Portuguese explorers in Canada?
 
 
It is believed that Diogo de Teive (1452), João Vaz Corte-Real (1470), Joao FERNANDES and Pedro de Barcelos (1493) touched on the eastern coast of Canada, and conclusive evidence exists about explorations by Miguel and Gaspar CORTE-REAL, who were lost in Newfoundland waters in 1501 and 1502 respectively.

 

 

The most known and accepted second hypotheses is that the Canadian Atlantic lands were discovered in 1472, by João Fernandes, a Portuguese sailor who offered the Portuguese King Dom Manuel I (1469-1521) his services to explore these new lands.

 

Aug 8, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here's a map of Portuguese exploration.

 

 

Wow. They landed in Newfoundland in 1473. But the official date is 1501 under Gaspar & Miguel Corte-Real. An expedition led by Pedro Álvares Cabral landed in Brazil in 1500.

Portuguese discoveries - Wikipedia

But I believe Basques, Bretons, Icelanders and Portuguese have been coming to Newfoundland and Labrador way before Columbus. The Grand Banks was full of cod. They fished there and landed to dry it into bacalao. Catholics eat fish on Fridays and Lent. All fishermen are the same around the world. They're not gonna blab about their lucrative fishing hole.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diogo de Teive discovers the Americas in the 1452

 

 

Diogo de Teive was a Portuguese navigator who, in 1451/1452, embarked on an expedition to explore the Atlantic Ocean west of Terceira island. This resulted in the discovery of Corvo and Flores, the two westernmost of the Azorean islands. Some rumors also say that he may have sighted North America during this voyage.

What if he not only sighted it, but actually managed to discover the continent more than 40 years before Columbus?

Presumably, he would find either Newfoundland, or, if he wandered further south, Nova Scotia or New England. This wouldn't be a particularly exciting discovery, I think. Columbus found gold in Cuba, Teive would only find cold. I can see him receiving whatever news lands he discovers as a hereditary captaincy, and they would most likely be an attempt to develop them as an extension of the Azores, which may successful or end up the same way as the later OTL Newfoundland colony...

The key question is, knowing that there is a large landmass to the west, and not being yet as razor-focused on India as they would later be (it wasn't even clear if it was possible to reach India by sea until Bartolomeu Dias' expedition of 1488), do the Portuguese do any more American exploration over the coming decades? Is there a possibility they may discover America's riches? How much of a head start do they have before other European countries show up in the western hemisphere?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Article

 

 

Diogo de Teive discovers the Americas in the 1452 | alternatehistory.com

 

 

 

Newfoundland discovered in 1452 by early Portuguese Explorers is possible, but it does require more research.

 

 

 

 

Reply
Prau123 avatar
Posts: 2565
Topic starter
(@prau123)
Famed Member
Joined: 5 years ago

 

 

image
image
image

 

So finally we have proof of what Basque people have known since forever despite official history: that our sailors and whalers had been visiting America loooong before Columbus.

A book by French Étienne Cleirac (1647) - a well known eminence in the subject, author of the first ever naval dictionary - called Us et Coutume de la Mer (Habits and customs of the sea) has been located. It’s a book that wants to explain the recent history - at the time - of sailing and fishing, and it includes some very interesting things. First, in the index:

 

41: First discovery of America by the Basques, while hunting whales.
42: A Basque informs Christopher Columbus about Western Indias, and gives him directions.
43: Expedition or cruise of the Basques to the northern sea of Greenland.
44: Usual home of the whales during summer.
45: Out of envy and jaleousy, the English prevent and prohibit Basques from hunting whales (…)

 

And then, in depth:

 

40: So that following this route, they discovered 100 years before the sailing of Christopher Columbus, the big and little cod schools, the lands of Newfoundland, Capbreton and Baccaleos (which means cod in their language), Canada or New France, where the seas are plentiful and full of whales.
41: And if the Castilians hadn’t stealed the glory from the French of the first obtention of the Atlantic island that we call Western Indias, they would recognize - as the Flemish Cosmographers Cornelius Wytfliet & Antonio Magini have done - that the pilot that gave Christopher Columbus the first news and the knowledge and adress of this new world were our Basques of Newfoundland.
42: In the year 1617, several Basques - with the help of some merchants of Bordeaux - equipped some vessels for fishing in the icy sea of Greenland and the north of Ireland and Scotland (…)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Article

 

 

So finally we have proof of what Basque people... | Beautiful Basque Country (tumblr.com)

 

 

Reply
Prau123 avatar
Posts: 2565
Topic starter
(@prau123)
Famed Member
Joined: 5 years ago

 

 

Basques discover the Grand Banks 1372

Apr 16, 2008, 3:10:53 AM
 
 
I see the statement that the Basques discovered the Grand Banks
fishing grounds off Nova Scotia and Newfoundland in 1372. This is from
wikipedia but the same or nearly same phrase is used in any reference
to this event:

"Legend, rumor, hearsay, and some archaeological and documentary
evidence, however, suggest that Basques began dominating the history
of whaling when they discovered the Grand Banks by 1372. Basque
fishing, trading, or pirate ships rediscovered and perhaps even
pillaged the desperately isolated and likely abandoned Viking Eastern
Settlement on Greenland, probably before 1450. The details of what
exactly transpired there remain lost to the shroud of time; however,
the settlement probably disappeared during the 15th century."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medieval_European_maritime_culture&source=gmail&ust=1713821936122000&usg=AOvVaw3FpxgXit4qLqFIedhxWue P"> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medieval_European_maritime_culture

Does anyone know what the 'archeological and documentary evidence'

for this is?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Article

 

 

Basques discover the Grand Banks 1372 (google.com)

 

 

 

 

 

A lot of history has been lost in time. It's possible that the Basque people discovered the Americas in 1372. The Portuguese explorers may have had contact with the Basque also.

 

 

 

Reply
Prau123 avatar
Posts: 2565
Topic starter
(@prau123)
Famed Member
Joined: 5 years ago

 

Exploring unmarked & unexcavated ruins in Peru found on Google Earth!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Video

 

 

 

 

Reply
Prau123 avatar
Posts: 2565
Topic starter
(@prau123)
Famed Member
Joined: 5 years ago

 

Exploring unmarked ancient ruins in Peru, found on Google Earth! Part 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Video

 

 

 

 

 

Reply
Page 190 / 202