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Archaeology [Sticky] Archaeology by Prau123

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Ruysch Map of the World (1507)

 

 

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Right next to Terra Nova on the eastern side of Canada is the Two Island or Split Island named SANIS GRVENLANTEVS

 

 

Maps

 

File:Ruysch map, Gruenlant-Antilia.jpg - Wikimedia Commons

 

Microsoft Word - 313 Ruysch.docx (myoldmaps.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Map ( Zoom - In )

 

 

Ruysch map - Early world maps - Wikipedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Caverio Map of the World (1505)

 

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Caverio Map circa 1506 - Early world maps - Wikipedia

 

 

 

 

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Largest concentration of Palaeolithic art in Eastern Iberia discovered at Cueva Dones

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Archaeologists from the Universities of Zaragoza and Alicante have discovered the largest concentration of Palaeolithic cave art in Eastern Iberia during a study of the Cueva Dones.

Cueva Dones is a cave located in Millares, Spain, which was first discovered in 1821 when an earthquake exposed the entrance. The site consists of a single-gallery cave approximately 500 metres deep, that opens onto a steep canyon in the municipality of Millares.

In a recent study published in the journal Antiquity, archaeologists have identified over a hundred parietal motifs such as paintings and engravings which date from the Palaeolithic period around 24,000-years-ago. According to the researchers, Cueva Dones has the largest concentration of motifs in Eastern Iberia, and possibly Europe since the discovery at Atxurra (Bizkaia) in 2015.

 

Image Credit : Antiquity

110 graphic units have been identified, including at least 19 zoomorphic representations of animals such as horses, hinds (female red deer), aurochs, and stags. According to the study: “The rest of the art consists of conventional signs (rectangles, meanders), several panels of ‘macaroni’ (‘flutings’ made with either fingers or tools dragged across a soft surface), isolated lines, and poorly preserved unidentified paintings.”

A majority of the paintings have been made through the application of red clay found on the cave floor. Although painting in clay is known in Palaeolithic Art, examples of its usage are extremely rare.

“The Cueva Dones rock art is a key discovery in Mediterranean Palaeolithic art. While the project is still in its early stages, preliminary results reveal an enormous potential for research at the site and establish this assemblage as arguably the most important for the eastern Iberian coast,” said the study authors.


Antiquity

 

 

 

 

 

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https://www.heritagedaily.com/2023/09/largest-concentration-of-palaeolithic-art-in-eastern-iberia-discovered-at-cueva-dones/148504#:~:text=Archaeologists%20from%20the%20Universities%20of,an%20earthquake%20exposed%20the%20entrance.

 

 

 

 

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Scientists uncover hidden ancient drawings of animals in a Paleolithic cave using a technique to make them look 3D

 
Four images of a Paleolithic cave drawing of a horse in La Pasiega Cave in Spain, including two rendered in bright colors using DStretch software
The image of a horse in the La Pasiega Cave shown without and with DStretch software processing. 
Raquel Asiain/Pedro Saura
  • Archaeologists found three new drawings from tens of thousands of years ago in a Spanish cave.
  • They used a visual technique called stereoscopic photography to see the cave art like never before.
  • The technique made the art look 3D, which helped the archeologists make their new discovery. 

 

Archaeologists have discovered new Paleolithic animal paintings from tens of thousands of years ago hidden in a cave using an updated photography technique.

There are over 700 paintings lining the rock walls of the Cave of La Pasiega in north-central Spain, which anthropologists first discovered in 1911.

For the most part, scientists viewed them as two-dimensional drawings. But the ancient artists actually incorporated bumps, dips, and crevices from the rocks into their art that can't be fully appreciated in 2D.

That's why a team of researchers recently used a technique called stereoscopic photography to observe the cave art in a unique new way. They published their results in the journal Antiquity in August.

 

Stereoscopic photography is a technique that uses two separate images to give the illusion of 3D.

"The artists played with the lights and shadows produced by the volumes of the cave walls," archaeologist Raquel Asiain, lead author on the paper, told Insider via email. 

A crack in the wall might define the horse's chest, for example. Tracings or sketches might miss nuances in the rocks that 3D images can bring to life.

An old technique reveals new details

Dating back to the 1800s, stereoscopic photography itself is not new. Perhaps its most recognizable use is in View-Masters — the children's toy that presents separate images to the left and right eyes, creating a 3D illusion.

Asiain and her co-authors used a similar technique, taking two images 2.5 inches apart to mimic the average distance between the pupils of human eyes.

Using software, including Photoshop and DStretch, they processed the images for 3D glasses or virtual reality devices.

Once the scientists were able to see the drawings in 3D, they saw three new figures among the cave's walls that had never been seen before.

The figures included two horses and an extinct cattle species called an aurochs.

"Those figures were always there, but possibly the way of studying them kept them hidden," Asiain said.

Four images of a Paleolithic cave drawing of an auroch in La Pasiega Cave in Spain, including two rendered in bright colors using DStretch softwarehttps://i.insider.com/64fb6aeba39a1b00190c1a0e":{"contentType":"image/jpeg","aspectRatioW":1421,"aspectRatioH":1065} }" />
The image of an auroch in the La Pasiega Cave shown uses natural features of the cave, such as cracks, to help define the animal. 
Raquel Asiain/Pedro Saura

"The most exciting thing we have discovered is that the way artists used the natural shapes of rocks changed over time," Asiain said.

The newest drawings incorporated more of the rock features, only needing a few added painted lines to capture the outlines of the animals.

The art can help viewers connect with the people who made it and make them realize how similar they were, Asiain said.

 

"We do not know the messages they wanted to transmit or their purpose," she said, but she believes they sought beauty in these drawings.

 

 

 

 

 

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Scientists Uncover Ancient 3D Cave Drawings, Previously Unknown (businessinsider.com)

 

 

 

 

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Lost Ancient City From Over 1,500 Years Ago With Monkey Rock Art Discovered

Archaeologists have discovered a lost, pre-Hispanic city in southern Mexico that contains, among other finds, a rock engraving of a monkey seemingly identical to one discovered thousands of miles away in Peru.

A team of researchers made the discovery of the ancient settlement in the city of Acapulco, which is located on the country's Pacific Coast, Spanish news agency EFE reported.

The archaeological zone is located around 8 miles from the center of the city, which is one of the country's most popular tourist destinations.

The city covers an area of around 330 hectares (815 acres), according to archaeologists. The site may date back to around 400 A.D. and is thought to have been abandoned between 900 A.D. and 1200 A.D.

Stock image of the city of Acapulco, Mexico. Archaeologists have discovered a lost, pre-Hispanic settlement near the modern city.ISTOCK

Among the key finds at the site, researchers have identified 38 petroglyphs at the site, as well as circular calendars and the representation a rain deity.

Petroglyphs are images created by removing part of a rock surface using a range of techniques.

One of the petroglyphs found at the site depicts a monkey and is identical to one created by the iconic Nazca culture from Peru.

The Nazca culture flourished for hundreds of years—primarily in the first millennium A.D.—in parts of southern Peru. They are known for the Nazca Lines—huge designs etched into the desert, some of which measure hundreds of feet across.

In August this year, researchers announced the discovery of another ancient settlement that could be more than 1,300 years old in Mexico.

Archaeologists from the country's National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) uncovered the lost pre-Hispanic town in the Costa Grande region of Guerrero state, located in the southwest of the country along the Pacific coast.

The settlement, which is located on communal land, is spread out over an area of roughly 29 hectares (72 acres), according to the INAH.

Archaeologists decided to investigate the patch of land after locals alerted them to the existence of several mounds—likely of pre-Hispanic origin—at the location.

And in June, INAH announced the discovery of an ancient Maya city hidden in the jungles of southern Mexico.

The site is located in the Balamkú ecological reserve in the central part of Campeche state, INAH said in a statement.

The site, which contains several large pyramidal structures, was likely an important center in the region during the classic period of the Maya civilization (around 250-1,000 A.D.), according to archaeologists.

The Maya civilization dominated what is now southeastern Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and the western areas of El Salvador and Honduras for more than 3,000 years until the era of Spanish colonization.

 

 

 

 

 

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Lost Ancient City From Over 1,500 Years Ago With Monkey Rock Art Discovered (newsweek.com)

 

 

 

 

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