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Call me Charlie
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Mexico have the blood of the Aztecs and the Mayans. They builded the Mayan Pyramids and prayed to Gods who sacrificed the unlucky. If Mexicans and Philipines are related, they are related through blood, but not through the history of religion and violent past.

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ciccotelli
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@charlie

I have met Filipinos and they looked nothing like Aztecs. it's like saying light skin Indians and Greeks are the same. 

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Call me Charlie
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@ciccotelli Filipinos being Asian and with dna with Spaniards is more likely going to be different look with the Aztecs with Spaniard blood in them. If I am correct the mongloids in the Phillipines overtakes their dna. While the hispanic descent of the Aztecs overtakes their dna as well.

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Amado
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@ciccotelli

There is a few overlap but it's very minimal 

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Amado
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Call me Charlie
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@rodriguez I mean, they kind of look Asian.

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Amado
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@charlie

what does Asian mean anyway. 

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Call me Charlie
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@rodriguez

 
A·sian
/ˈāZHən/
 
adjective
  1. relating to Asia or its people, customs, or languages.
     
noun
  1. a native of Asia or a person of Asian descent.
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RAMBONIO
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@rodriguez

I think he meant mongoloid 

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Prau123
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@rambo

 

Are Indians(India) considered Asians?  They are not Mongoloids but they are on the Asian continent.  Some Indians view themselves separate from Asians.

 

 

The indigenous population of India was assumed to be intermediate between Caucasoid and Australoid.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Prau123
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@rodriguez

 

Mayans appear like several Native American Indian across the Americas.   I couldn't tell the difference between a Mayan and an Aztec Indian also.   Some could pass as Polynesians and some could pass as Southeast Asians.

 

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Amado
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@prau123

I don't think so, Indians in Central America would stick out. If you been to Guyana you can clearly see the difference with a Indian and the indigenous people.

South East Asians are very mongoloid looking compared to Mayans . If A native Mayan were to overlap with South East Asians, it would be minorities of South East Asian.

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Prau123
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@rodriguez

 

Guyana people

 

The Untold/Forgotten Stories of Guyanese Indigenous Folklore – Things Guyana

 

 

If I probably visited the country Guyana, then I may see some differences.  At first sight, I couldn't tell much difference between Guyana people and other indigenous people in Central America.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Amado
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@prau123

Guyana is a diverse nation; 39.8% of the population is of Indian origin (see Indo-Guyanese), 30% African (see Afro-Guyanese), 19.9% multiracial (almost all part African, including Dougla, Creole-Mulatto, Zambo-Maroon, and Pardo), 10.5% Amerindian and 0.5% other, mostly Chinese, Europeans (most notably Portuguese)

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Prau123
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@rodriguez

 

Indians in India do look different from Native American Indians in Central America and South America.

 

Portuguese colonized Goa in India and they became Roman Catholics and these Indians as well as others migrated to Guyana

 

.

 

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Amado
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@prau123

South Asian are more closer to Persians while native Americans are migrated from East Asia.

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Prau123
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@rodriguez

 

you're right, they are apples and oranges in comparison.  

 

Have you seen some South Asians such as Indians and Persians in Mexico? 

 

 

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Amado
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@prau123

Yes there are Indians from new Delhi in Mexico but they are very rare. 

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Prau123
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@rodriguez

 

Indians are everywhere in the world and they are also in the Philippines.  They are cell-phone retailers and run other tech businesses.  

 

 

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Prau123
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@rodriguez

 

Possibly Merida city in Mexico since it's been advertised as the second most safest city in the Americas only to Quebec city in Canada.  Several foreigners are visiting Merida and some have decided to live there for good.

 

 

 

According to Ceoworld magazine, the Yucatecan capital is the second safest city in the whole American continent, only second to Quebec (Canada), which occupies the third position in the world's classification.Sep 3, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

Merida

 

 

 

 

 

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Prau123
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@rodriguez

 

Mayans, Aztecs and several Mesoamerican structures appear more alike than different also as if they influenced each others architectural style and construction method. 

 

 

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Prau123
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@rodriguez

 

Mayans are in the Yucatan Peninsula, facing the Caribbean Sea, would they appear more like Caribbean also?

 

 

 

 

Prau123 may have some Mayan features but I doubt I could pass up as a typical Mayan.

 

 

 

 

Prau123 picture

 

 

 

 

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RAMBONIO
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@prau123

Mayans have pointy nose, longer faces, pointy jaws. our skull structure is different. 

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Prau123
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@rambo

 

Mexicans have actually told me before that Filipino appearance doesn't quite resemble people in Mexico.

 

 

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RAMBONIO
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@prau123

I am going to visit Mexico and rest of Latin America. Yes we are different but I still see them as a cousin or something. 

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Prau123
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@rambo

 

Cool and by the time you come back you probably speak fluent Spanish.

I heard it's possible to drive it also but it may be a little unsafe on some parts especially in Central America.  

 

 

 

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Prau123
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@rambo

 

It may take several months to a year, maybe more to visit all those cities and tourist spots.

 

 

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Prau123
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@rambo

 

 

Several sites recommend taking a bus ride instead.

 

 

 
 
How far can you drive into South America?
 
 
 
 
 
 
You can drive from Prudhoe Bay, Alaska to the tip of South America, almost 25,000 miles using the Pan-American Highway. However, the Highway ends at the Darien Gap, a 90-mile roadless region of rainforests and swamps that basically renders it impossible to drive the whole distance to South America.
 

 

 

This 100 mile section of impassible jungle between Central & South America is called the Darien GapThere are no roads that span the jungle here, only footpaths. ... For those interested in driving through to South America, you'd have to ship your vehicle from Panama City to the town of Turbo, Colombia via cargo ship.

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.tripsavvy.com/top-road-trip-routes-south-america-2553524

 

 

 

The northern terminus of the South American section begins in the Colombian town of Turbo, which then snakes down the western coast of the continent until reaching Valparaíso, Chile. From here, the rest of the journey depends on the driver. The official route cuts east to Buenos Aires, Argentina, and ends there. But if you have the time, money, and desire to traverse the entire continent, you could continue down from Buenos Aires to Ushuaia, Argentina, the southernmost city in the world. Other travelers skip Argentina completely and continue traveling south in Chile from Valparaíso. To do the trip justice, you would need several weeks to complete it, if not a few months.

It's a long, difficult, expensive, and sometimes dangerous drive. If you were to start in Turbo, Colombia, and finish in Buenos Aires, the trip would be nearly 5,000 miles (over 8,000 kilometers). Add roughly an additional 2,000 miles to that total if you continue down to the southern tip.

But the ultimate South America road trip isn't meant to be easy; it's meant to be rewarding. You'll go through five different countries—Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Chile, and Argentina—and experience each place in a way you'd never be able to if you were just flying to big cities. 

 

 

 

You probably want to take the eastern route to Uruguay and Brazil.

 

 

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Prau123
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@rambo

 

I do forget to remind myself some times that it's Mexican Pesos instead of the Philippines Pesos.

 

 

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Amado
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@rambo

Are you going to look for the Filipinos that integrated in Mexico?

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Amado
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@prau123

I think you can pass in Bolivia & Peru 

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Prau123
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@rodriguez 

 

I was expecting that you would say Southern Mexican with indigenous features.

 

Thanks, I should consider visiting Bolivia and Peru, but I have to adjust to the high altitude elevations of their Andes Mountains.   

 

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Amado
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@prau123

Mexico have South East Asian looks but it's atypical for the general population. I worked with Filipinos so I can Identify Filipinos easily, but the Mexicans that never had exposure to Filipinos might consider you a local. Indigenous Rights in Mexico by sineaddunphy01 on emazeYalitza Aparicio Is Supporting Indigenous Filmmakers in Mexico | IndieWire

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Prau123
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@rodriguez

 

I see them where I live.  They eat tacos and burritos but some eat pupusa (pupuseria) which suggest that they are originally from Southern parts in Mexico, maybe Oaxaca region since the city is known for their queso cheese which goes well with pupusa?

 

 

 

 

 

Pupusa

 

Pupusas recipe : SBS Food

 

 

 

 

 

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Prau123
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@rodriguez

 

Peruvian dish is similar to Mariscos in Mexico since Peru has a long coastline, they serve Ceviche, fresh natural seafood.

Bolivia situated inland in South America, serves free ranging poultry and live stocks however they do share Lake Titicaca with Peru and therefore they catch fresh water fish.

 

 

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Prau123
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I was looking at some pictures of people in Peru and Bolivia and I do pass (barely), but the locals ( Inca descendants ) would likely consider me as a foreigner instead of one of them.  

 

 

 

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Amado
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@prau123

Majority are mestizos in Peru and Bolivia, but many Peruvians can pass as Filipino in my opinion.

 

Peruvian Model Poses Lima Peru Brazilian Dinner Dress Active Look — Stock  Photo © raykehoe #232683376

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Prau123
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@rodriguez

 

Peru opened up international flight to Latin American countries.  Maybe in a few months, USA will be on the list of countries allowed to visit Peru.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oct. 5, Peru opened flights from 11 cities in seven neighboring nations as part of its phase four economic reactivation. The countries include Ecuador, Bolivia, Paraguay, Colombia, Panama, Uruguay, and Chile.

 

 

 

https://www.travelandleisure.com/airlines-airports/peru-international-flights-returning

 

 

 

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Prau123
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Similarities and differences between Philippines and Mexico

 

 

 

 

 

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Prau123
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The more south you go to Mexico, the more similar people are to typical Filipinos.  The southern Mexicans have indigenous features along with a medium-sized built and height.

 

 

 

 

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Prau123
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Chavacano, a Spanish creole language, is spoken in Zamboanga city in Mindanao, Philippines.  Probably Mexicans and Latinos could easily adapt to this city and culture. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some Nahuatl terminologies ( Native Aztec language) made it's way in Chavacano.

 

Here's a list of Nahuatl vocabulary words that is found in Chavacano

 

 

Zacate  means "grass" 

 

Tiangge  means "market"

 

Chongo  means "monkey"

 

Camote  means "sweet potato"

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Prau123
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Spaniard, Argentinian, Mexican and a Dominican in this video could understand Chavacano.   These people do not need an interpreter, translator or translator app.

 

 

 

 

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Amado
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@prau123

it sounds weird 😀 just imagine hearing someone speak English mixed with other language. 

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Prau123
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@rodriguez

 

funny, Filipinos do this frequently even with Tagalog today. Tagalog sounds like a bunch of words from other languages some times.

Chavacano sound as if the words are not in order and depending on the speaker the accent may sound different from typical Spanish (Spanish Castilian).

 

 

 

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Prau123
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@rodriguez

 

I forgot to ask, could you understand what they said also.

 

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Amado
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@prau123

 Chavacano is good enough to communicate with anyone, I can understand it. Also, Chavacano means APRICOT 😋 

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Prau123
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@rodriguez

 

Thanks, I was not aware what Chavacano meant.

 

Philippines doesn't grow apricots and the locals there have no idea what that fruit is and the few that do know about this fruit have actually never tried an apricot before.  The only Filipinos who have tried apricot before are the ones here in America or Canada. The fruit only grows in colder regions which Philippines does not have except in high mountainous regions.

 

 

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Amado
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@prau123

Apricot is the fruit from an apricot tree. Apricot is used for asthmacoughconstipationbleeding, infertility, eyeinflammation, spasm, and vaginal infections. In manufacturing, apricot oil is used in cosmetics.

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Prau123
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@rodriguez

 

I always confused apricot with nectarine.  The fruit taste well and it's also healthy.  I've tried apricot before and it's usually served as a fruit cocktail in the bar section of a restaurant or buffet and they do sell them in cans at the local supermarket here.

 

 

 

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Amado
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@prau123

also used in pies

Gingered Apricot Pie Recipe - Pillsbury.com

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Prau123
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@rodriguez

 

Delicious pie!  Instead of Pumpkin Pie on Thanksgiving Holiday, I'll purchase an Apricot pie.

 

 

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Prau123
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@rodriguez

 

 

 

 

Chavacano  -  Mexican Spanish

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chavacano

 

 

The Chavacano languages in the Philippines are creoles based on Mexican Spanish and possibly, Portuguese. In some Chavacano languages, most words are common with Andalusian Spanish, but there are many words borrowed from Nahuatl, a language native to Central Mexico, which aren’t found in Andalusian Spanish. Although the vocabulary is largely Mexican, its grammar is mostly based on other Philippine languages, primarily IlonggoTagalog and Cebuano. By way of Spanish, its vocabulary also has influences from the Native American languages NahuatlTainoQuechua, etc. as can be evidenced by the words chongo (monkey, instead of Spanish 'mono'), tiange (mini markets), etc.[cita

 

 

 

Chavacano or Chabacano  is a group of Spanish-based creole language varieties spoken in the Philippines. The variety spoken in Zamboanga City, located in the southern Philippine island group of Mindanao, has the highest concentration of speakers. Other currently existing varieties are found in Cavite City and Ternate, located in the Cavite province on the island of Luzon.[4] Chavacano is the only Spanish-based creole in Asia.[5]

 

 

Varieties[edit]

 

 

 
 
 
 

Native Zamboangueño speakers in Mindanao

 
 
 

Linguists have identified at least six Spanish Creole varieties in the Philippines. Their classification is based on their substrate languages and the regions where they are commonly spoken. The three known varieties of Chavacano with Tagalog as their substrate language are the Luzon-based creoles of which are Caviteño (spoken in Cavite City), Bahra or Ternateño (spoken in Ternate, Cavite) and Ermiteño (once spoken in the old district of Ermita in Manila and is now extinct).

 

 

 

Variety

Places

Native speakers

Zamboangueño (Zamboangueño/Zamboangueño Chavacano/Chabacano de Zamboanga)

Zamboanga CityBasilanSuluTawi-TawiZamboanga del SurZamboanga del NorteZamboanga Sibugay,

359,000 (Rubino 2008, citing 2000 census)[6]

Caviteño (Chabacano di Nisos/Chabacano de Cavite)

Cavite

4,000 (2013)[6]

Cotabateño (Chabacano de Cotabato)

Cotabato CityMaguindanao

Extinct

Castellano Abakay (Chabacano Davaoeño)

Davao Region, Davao City

Extinct

Ternateño (Bahra)

Ternate

3,000 (2013)[6]

Ermiteño (Ermitense)

Ermita

Extinct

There are a number of theories on how these different varieties of Chavacano have evolved and how they are related to one another. According to some linguists, Zamboangueño Chavacano is believed to have been influenced by Caviteño Chabacano as evidenced by prominent Zamboangueño families who descended from Spanish Army officers (from Spain and Latin America), primarily Caviteño mestizos, stationed at Fort Pilar in the 19th century. When Caviteño officers recruited workers and technicians from Iloilo to man their sugar plantations and rice fields to reduce the local population's dependence on the Donativo de Zamboanga, the Spanish colonial government levied taxes on the islanders to support the fort's operations. With the subsequent migration of Ilonggo traders to Zamboanga, the Zamboangueño Chavacano was infused with Hiligaynon words as the previous migrant community was assimilated.[7]

 

 

 

 

 

The highest number of Chavacano speakers are found in Zamboanga City and in the island province of Basilan. A significant number of Chavacano speakers are found in Cavite City and Ternate. There are also speakers in some areas in the provinces of Zamboanga del SurZamboanga SibugayZamboanga del Norte, Davao, and in Cotabato City. According to the official 2000 Philippine census, there were altogether 607,200 Chavacano speakers in the Philippines in that same year. The exact figure could be higher as the 2000 population of Zamboanga City, whose main language is Chavacano, far exceeded that census figure. Also, the figure doesn’t include Chavacano speakers of the Filipino diaspora. All the same, Zamboangueño is the variety with the most number of speakers, being the official language of Zamboanga City whose population is now believed to be over a million; is also an official language in Basilan.

 

 

 

 

Zamboangueño[edit]

 

 

On 23 June 1635,Zamboanga Citybecame a permanent foothold of the Spanish government with the construction of the San José Fortress. Bombardment and harassment from pirates and raiders of the sultans of Mindanao and Jolo and the determination to spread Christianity further south (as Zamboanga was a crucial strategic location) of the Philippines forced the Spanish missionary friars to request reinforcements from the colonial government.

The military authorities decided to import labour from Luzon and the Visayas. Thus, the construction workforce eventually consisted of Spanish, Mexican and Peruvian soldiers, masons from Cavite (who comprised the majority), sacadas from Cebu and Iloilo, and those from the various local tribes of Zamboanga like the Samals and Subanons.

 

 

 

Chavacano speakers are also found in Semporna and elsewhere in Sabah as Sabah was under partial Spanish sovereignty ...

 

 

 

 

 

In 2010 the Instituto Cervantes de Manila estimated the number of Spanish speakers in the Philippines in the area of three million,[13] which included the native and the non-native Chavacano and Spanish speakers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_language_in_the_Philippines

 

 

Demographics[edit]

 

 

According to the 1990 Philippine census, there were 2,660 native Spanish speakers in the Philippines.[14] In 2013 there were also 3,325 Spanish citizens living in the Philippines.[15] However, there are 439,000 Spanish speakers with native knowledge,[16] which accounts for just 0.5% of the population (92,337,852 at the 2010 census).[17] In 1998, there were 1.8 million Spanish speakers including those who spoke Spanish as a secondary language.[18]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MAP

 

Chavacano is spoken in Philippines but also in eastern parts of Sabah, Indonesia

 

East Timor - Leste  in Indonesia speaks Portuguese

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Prau123
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Posted by: @rodriguez

@prau123

 Chavacano is good enough to communicate with anyone, I can understand it. Also, Chavacano means APRICOT 😋 

 

 

 

 

However you would reply back to them in Spanish, but could the Chavacano speakers understand you speaking Spanish to them?  Maybe you should do a video on it?   😊 

 

 

 

 

 

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Amado
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@prau123

Most Filipinos speak tagalog right? 

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Prau123
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@rodriguez

 

yes, you're right, most Filipinos speak Tagalog.

In their region they usually speak their local language or local dialect.  They usually speak Tagalog with Filipinos who are not from their region.

 

 

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Prau123
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Mazatlan, Mexico  (where brothers Juan and Benito Machado, both born in Manila, are the city's founding fathers).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mazatl%C3%A1n

 

 

In 1829, a Filipino banker named Juan Nepomuceno Machado arrived and established commercial relations with vessels coming to Mazatlán from far off places such as Chile, Peru, the United States, Europe, and Asia Pacific. By 1836, the city had a population of between 4,000 and 5,000.

 

a Spanish banker named Machado, through his commercial activities, gave impetus to the village of Mazatlán in 1836, then a village of four to five thousand people. It subsequently became the largest port on the Mexican Pacific coast.

 

 

 

 

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/tales-of-mazatlans-plaza_b_10536384

 

 

 

 

Tales of Mazatlan's Plaza Machado

 

This post was published on the now-closed HuffPost Contributor platform. Contributors control their own work and posted freely to our site. If you need to flag this entry as abusive,send us an email.

2016-06-17-1466204274-9232431-M1.jpg
Built in the 1820s, the plaza has been drawing visitors ever since.

No one's really sure why he came to Mazatlan, but in the late 1820s a fellow from the Philippines showed up on the docks of this little Mexican town on the Pacific. His name was Juan Nepomuceno Machado, and he created something that's since been enjoyed by millions of visitors to Mazatlan - everyone from foreign miners to old-time movie stars to modern-day tourists.

Local legends say Machado was drawn to Mazatlan by the pearl diving business there. Or perhaps by trading opportunities at the town's busy deep-water port. Or maybe by the silver mines outside town in the nearby Sierra Madres.

Whatever the reason, he went on to build a block-long plaza said to have looked much like a neo-classical European town square. It was likely ringed by porticoed walkways, shops behind wrought-iron lattices, small inns and al fresco cafes shaded by orange trees. Tales say it was a pleasant place, where Mazatlecos could take leisurely strolls, chat with friends, catch up on the latest gossip and go to a concert in the evening.

2016-06-17-1466204335-853250-M2.JPG
The plaza today hosts the city's holiday celebrations.

 

 

 

 

 

Show item 1 of 22. Plaza Machado - Mazatlan - Tourism Media

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Map

 

 

Map of Sinaloa

 

 

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Prau123
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Mazatlan

 

 

Mazatlan

 

 

 

 

Elevated view of a beach in Mazatlán on a sunny day

 

 

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Prau123
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Mezcal, a Mexican alcohol drink, was made by unknown Filipinos in the 16th century. Prior to the arrival of the Filipinos, the native Mexican Indians cooked the agave pina and fermented its juice .  The Filipinos who arrived in Mexico during the Manila - Acapulco Galleon Trade introduced the distillation process.

 

 

 

 

Mezcal  is a distilled alcoholic beverage made from any type of agave. The word mezcal comes from Nahuatl mexcalli, which means "oven-cooked agave"

 

 

 

 

 

 

Video

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Filipino roots of mezcal

 

 

 

It turns out that this most Mexican of drinks is unknown from pre-Columbian times, although of course the cooked stems and floral peduncles of various species of Agave were used as a carbohydrate source by the ancient populations of what is now western Mexico, and drinks were made from both these and their sap. But, apparently, distillation had to wait until a Filipino community became established in the Colima hills in the 16th century. They were brought over to establish coconut plantations, and started producing coconut spirits, as they had done back home. The practice was eventually outlawed in the early 17th century, and this prohibition, plus increased demand for hard liquor by miners, led to its application to agaves instead, and its rapid spread. The first record of mezcal is from 1619. Mexicans (not to mention other tequila aficionados the world over) have a lot to thank Filipinos for.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://news.abs-cbn.com/ancx/food-drink/features/10/04/18/the-legend-of-the-ancient-filipino-mezcalero

 

 

In Mexico to explore the legend of the ancient Filipino mezcalero

 

The story goes that mezcal was not created by Mexicans but was actually invented by Filipinos. As ridiculous as it sounds at first blush, the claim has some plausibility.

 

 

 

And it sustains  a group of artisans that  practice a Mexican tradition that has caught fire in North America: the making of mezcal. Because Santa Catalina Minas is the motherlode—where it is said that the finest artisanal mezcals are made.  

 

Like other devotees, I travelled to this town to meet the mezcaleros, to sample the different varietals, and to buy a few precious bottles of the liquid magic to smuggle home to Manila. But unlike my fellow enthusiasts, I had another motive: to investigate a legend that mezcal was not created by Mexicans but was actually invented by Filipinos.

 

 

Here’s where the history gets murky: those first alembic stills to arrive in Mexico supposedly didn’t come from Spain but were brought by the Spanish galleon trade from the Philippines. The story goes that while our fellow colonial subjects in the Western hemisphere were swilling their pulque, we indios were already actively distilling fermented coconut liquor intolambanog. One fine day, in the midst of our mutual colonial subjugation, a galleon arrived in Acapulco from the Philippines carrying with it an unspecified number of indio crewmen.  Having endured so much hardship on the months’ long journey, some of the crewmen decided to settle in Mexico, and brought with them their worldly belongings, including an old alembic still.  After settling into their new homes, it didn’t take the indios long to discover pulque.

 

 

Mezcalero Felix Angeles, whose family has been making mezcal for generations, wondering why we came all the way from Asia to visit his palenque.

 

 

 

After all, if your worldly belongings included a pot still, it would’ve just been a matter of time before you tried the local libation.  Supposedly, they had the bright idea of distilling it, and as a result produced the world’s first bottle of small batch mezcal.  Perhaps as a way to ease their assimilation into their new communities, the indios shared not just the mezcal, but also the secrets of distillation.  And that, they say, was the beginning of the single greatest Filipino contribution to global culture.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Like Tequila and Mezcal? Try Raicilla, Mexico’s Original Moonshine

 

 

 

After the piñas have roasted below ground, they’re mashed and left to ferment for around 30 days before they move to distillation. On the coast, traditional wood-fired stills, commonly referred to as Filipino-style, have been favored for more than 200 years. Distillation occurs inside a clay or copper chamber, itself contained within a hollow tree trunk. Mountainous raicilla producers lean toward copper alembic pot stills.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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BLACK LIVES MATTER
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Are they other Asians in Mexico?

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Prau123
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@naval

 

 

There are other Asians that arrived there in the 1900's.  

 

 

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Prau123
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@naval

 

The latest Asian immigrants are from Korea.

 

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Amado
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@naval

Turks, Arabs & a few Chinese

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Call me Charlie
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@rodriguez I heard the Koreans and Mexicans has similar culture. I don't know if that is true.

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Amado
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@charlie

is what way? I feel closer to Filipinos than I do with the Koreans. Some of the Koreans are Christians so I can relate to that 

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Call me Charlie
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@rodriguez I am not sure. But let me think.. There is a civil war between North and South Korea. Mexico has alot of civil wars between many cartels (even though North and South Korea is in an armistice). North Korea has a corrupted government. Mexico has corrupted police force, and even all the way up to the people that controls Mexico. Mexico has poor dilapidated areas and even rich part of the areas. While North is very poor, but South is mostly rich. Even though South has poor areas as well. The people of Mexico are very hard workers. Overall I think both Koreas are very hard workers.

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Amado
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@charlie

both Koreans and Mexicans are hard workers. 

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Call me Charlie
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@rodriguez There you go.

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Prau123
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Amado

 

Where do you usually meet Filipinos?

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Amado
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@prau123

my co-workers are Filipinos  😍 I met a lot in the hospitals

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Prau123
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@rodriguez

 

I should have known, I know Mexicans make up a large percentage of the Medical field here in SoCal.  

 

 

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Prau123
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Chavacano Songs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Prau123
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Nanay, Tatay, Palenke and Calabaza are Filipino words that originated from Nahuatl, an Aztec Mexican language.

 

 

Nanay - Mom

Tatay - Dad

Palenke - Market

Calabaza - Squash

 

 

 ( scroll to 3:58 in the video )

 

 

Mexican and Philippines History

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Prau123
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Amado, 

 

 

 

 

 

Mexicans in Philippines number 1.7 million in 2010   

( scroll to 49 seconds in the video )

 

 

 

Mexican settlement in the Philippines

 

 

 

 

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