Notifications
Clear all

Filipino Food  

Page 3 / 3

Prau123
Posts: 794
(@prau123)
Prominent Member
Joined: 2 years ago

Mashed avocados mixed with milk (or evaporated milk) and sugar (and ice) is another popular Filipino drink or dessert especially in the past.  I'm not sure if this dish is exclusive to Filipinos.  Avocados are not native to the Philippines or Asia as it originates in the Americas.  But there were no cows or goats in the Americas before Columbus except for Bison (which is usually found north of Mexico, although some existed in Mexico).  Llamas are found in the Andes of South America.  The Desert Bighorn Sheep exist in Mexico, but were they used to extract milk?   

Another similar dish, is strips of Canteloupes and milk (or evaporated milk) and sugar (and ice).  Again I don't know if this dish is exclusive to Filipinos.  Mexicans and perhaps other Latinos have a drink that mixes strips of canteloupes with water as part of their "agua fresca" lineup.  With a quick check on the internet there appears to be some mixed with milk and even condensed milk, but most appear to be just mixed with water and sweetened with sugar.  

Of course after Columbus, cows and goats were introduced, and milk could have been mixed with avocados and canteloupes in Mexico and other parts of Latin America.

 

 

Reply
1 Reply
Prau123
(@prau123)
Joined: 2 years ago

Prominent Member
Posts: 794

Avocado, milk, and sugar mixture appears to be a type of Lamaw:

 

The name of the dessert is from Visayan lamaw, meaning "swill" or "slop", due to its appearance. The term can sometimes also be used to refer to similar desserts made from papaya or avocado with milk and sugar.

 

 

I forgot that papaya can also be mixed with milk and sugar (and ice).  Again papaya is native to the Americas specifically Mexico and Northern South America, so I don't know if this drink is exclusive to the Philippines.  But the various lamaw drinks can include crackers and peanuts as toppings.  But then again peanuts are from the Americas.  But perhaps the most common lamaw is with young coconut, milk, and sugar.  

 

 

Reply
Prau123
Posts: 794
(@prau123)
Prominent Member
Joined: 2 years ago

The following pies may have been invented during or after the American Period since pie making is an American introduction from what I've read.  According to Wikipedia, the Buko pie was invented in the province of Laguna (Southern Luzon).  Buko means coconut, and the Buko pie specifically uses young coconut meat.  It's unsure where the Egg pie was invented.  My guess would be Southern Luzon region.  Both pies are very delicious.  These are the two pies that I'm familiar with in the Philippines.  

 

Buko Pie

 

Egg Pie

Reply
Prau123
Posts: 794
(@prau123)
Prominent Member
Joined: 2 years ago

 

Filipino Leche Flan was actually one my favorite desserts growing up.  I would eat this custard dessert before the main dish some times at a Filipino party. Somehow Filipinos never made enough Leche Flans for everyone at the party.  If you want your share of Leche Flan then take a slice during meal time before it's gone.  

Leche Flan is made of eggs, milk, condense milk and caramelized sugar.  The dish is known as Creme Caramel in other countries and it's popular in Latin European and Latin American countries.  

 

 

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cr%C3%A8me_caramel

 

 

Leche Flan

 

Instant Pot Leche Flan is Today's Delight.

 

 

 

 

 

Reply
Bacano G
Posts: 364
(@jose)
Reputable Member
Joined: 6 months ago

Filipino Food is similar to what we eat. 

you guys eat plantain, pasteitos empanada, longaniza, chicharron just like we do. Our food has similar cooking. 

 

Reply
3 Replies
Prau123
(@prau123)
Joined: 2 years ago

Prominent Member
Posts: 794

@jose

Yes it's true, and it's obviously because of the Manila-Acapulco Galleon trade for several centuries, and also what Columbus and Europeans brought over directly to the Americas.  

Philippines acquired from the America's many fruits, vegetables, and other plants especially those that grow well in a tropical climate or hill/mountainous climate:  Chayote, jicama, tomatoes, corn, chico(sapodilla), atis (sugar-apple or sweetsop), guyabano (guanabana or soursop), cherimoya, pineapples, avocados, peanuts, papayas, kamonsil (camachile), various squashes, sweet potato, chili peppers, paprika, bell peppers, potatoes, cassava, cacao, vanilla, cotton (a pre-Columbian introduction), and tobacco.  Also, sunflower seeds, rubber trees (not for eating of course), coca (for making cola as in Coca-cola and Pepsi and also for making the drug cocaine), and the natural sweetener Stevia (ka'a he'ê) are not grown in the Philippines necessarily but are popular or growing in popularity.  There are more, but these are the more common ones. 

The Americas acquired from Asia various citrus fruits such as lemon, limes, and oranges, pomelo which is one of the ancestors of the grapefruit, sugar, bananas, mangos, coconuts (actually a pre-Columbian introduction), abaca (not an edible plant, but it has other utilitarian purposes), black pepper or peppercorn, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, cardamom (Guatemala is now the world's largest producer!), tamarind, some yams, pears, apples, peaches, apricots, some plums, ginger, onions, garlic, pomegranates, grapes and wine, spinach, carrots, fig, saffron, aloe vera, almonds, wheat, barley, oats, chickens, cows, goats, horses, all types of alcohol, all types of vinegar, marijuana, and teas, .  These seem to be the most popular ones from Asia.  There is rambutan, jackfruit (langka), sago, taro, and breadfruit grown in selected areas of the Americas. 

 

There are many more products that each side of the world has to offer but is not still popular such as mulberries, durian, calamansi, lanzones, santol, mangosteen from Asia, and yerba mate, cactus parts (tuna and nopal), turkey meat, mammee (Mammea americana), acorns, and various berries from the Americas.  

Reply
Bacano G
(@jose)
Joined: 6 months ago

Reputable Member
Posts: 364

@prau123

thanks my man, I look forward about learning about Filipinos. You have to give me time to study about your history. 

Reply
Prau123
(@prau123)
Joined: 2 years ago

Prominent Member
Posts: 794

@jose

 

 

Filipino food and Caribbean food are like mirror images of one another - you know at least some food history there.   😎 

 

Reply
Prau123
Posts: 794
(@prau123)
Prominent Member
Joined: 2 years ago

Lumpiang togue is lumpia that's predominantly made with mung bean sprouts as its inner filling, although a little bit of pork meat (or chicken, beef, shrimp), carrots, onions, and garlic, and possibly string beans or green beans and jicama can also be added.  This type of lumpia is generally shorter but thicker, and very crispy due to its larger surface area.  It is dipped in a vinegar and soy sauce dip consisting of salt, pepper, and garlic but also some onions and chili peppers if you prefer.  It's a very addicting dish as it compliments the vinegar and soy sauce dip very well.  You'll find yourself eating a lot of it quickly with lots of rice, and dipping often.  You can often see the inner filling from the outside.  Sometimes the wrapper gets warped or slightly unwrapped when fried, but it's these imperfections that gives it a crispier texture, and is great for dipping.  Apart from the wrapper, the mung bean sprouts and carrots lend themselves very well to frying which gives this dish an overall crispy texture, and again great for dipping.  Lumpiang togue is all about crispiness and dipping.    

You can learn more about lumpiang togue from Wikipedia:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lumpiang_gulay#Lumpiang_togue

 

Just like any Filipino dish, people cook lumpiang togue slightly differently as you'll see in the following videos:

 

 

Reply
9 Replies
Call me Charlie
(@charlie)
Joined: 1 year ago

Honorable Member
Posts: 589

@prau123 well having the name lumpia togue its almost like you saying lumpia tongue. But was does togue means anyway?

Reply
Prau123
(@prau123)
Joined: 2 years ago

Prominent Member
Posts: 794

@charlie

To be honest with you, I don't know.  In fact, I didn't even know the exact name of this dish.  I had to search for it by description.  I came upon this dish at a party, and every year, that family would bring the same dish every time.  It was a favorite of theirs that they bought at a restaurant.  But I don't remember if they ever gave me the name of the dish or even if they knew it.  A lot of Filipino food is like that.  You just know what it is, but don't know the exact name for it. But I will do research on the word "togue", and yes it does sound like tongue.  

Reply
Prau123
(@prau123)
Joined: 2 years ago

Prominent Member
Posts: 794

I just reread the Wikipedia article, and togue means "mung bean sprouts".  

Reply
Call me Charlie
(@charlie)
Joined: 1 year ago

Honorable Member
Posts: 589

@prau123 Oh okay. I tried lumpia before. I think it was beef or pork, not too sure, but it was really good. I asked my friend if there is any Filipino restaurants around my location, and he was like, I would know a place, but it would not be good. I asked why, and he said he is used to the food and it does not satisfy him like how others try foreign food. The only Filipino thing I ever tried was lumpia, and I want to try other Filipino cuisines. 

Reply
Prau123
(@prau123)
Joined: 2 years ago

Prominent Member
Posts: 794

@charlie

Lumpia is a good start into Filipino food.  It's something non-Filipinos are somewhat familiar too since many people have eaten Chinese egg rolls.  As you probably know by now, there are some Filipino foods that can be very similar to America, Latin America, Spain, and possibly Portugal largely due to the historical connections.  But there are also very marked differences, and it's those more exotic foods of the Philippines that takes time for non-Filipinos to get accustomed to.   

 

I should clarify that the Philippines has no direct historical connection with Portugal, but there are indirect connections via Spain.

Reply
Call me Charlie
(@charlie)
Joined: 1 year ago

Honorable Member
Posts: 589

@prau123 i would understand, since Spain conquered the Phillipines. Just like how France conquered Vietnam. That is why Vietnam food is French-influenced. Such as Phillipines food is influenced by the Spainiards. If I am correct.

Reply
Prau123
(@prau123)
Joined: 2 years ago

Prominent Member
Posts: 794

@charlie

Yes that's true.

Reply
Call me Charlie
(@charlie)
Joined: 1 year ago

Honorable Member
Posts: 589

@prau123 Yeah, Tagalog and Spanish is kinda similar. Due to them using english alphabet. Are you by chance Filipino?

Reply
Prau123
(@prau123)
Joined: 2 years ago

Prominent Member
Posts: 794

@charlie

I'm a world citizen let's put it that way that happens to appreciate Filipino culture.  Yeah Tagalog and Spanish have similarities due to the large number of loan words from Spanish, and the relatively few Tagalog loan words into Spanish.  

Reply
Prau123
Posts: 794
(@prau123)
Prominent Member
Joined: 2 years ago

Piaya (or piyaya as it's most commonly called)

 

The piaya is a type of flat bread dessert.  It's very sweet.  The flat bread has an interior filled with muscovado (basically unrefined or partially refined sugar) or ube (similar in color and taste to taro).  There are other flavors also.  Sesame seeds are sprinkled on top, and then the whole thing is baked.  This dessert hails from the province of Negros Occidental.  Negros Occidental is the largest producer of sugar in the Philippines, and it's only fitting that this sweet dish originates from there.  I've never tried freshly made piaya.  It's made commercially, and given as gifts, and that's how I've often eaten it.  You can eat it directly as is from the package, but I find it better tasting when microwaved until the muscovado or ube is melted for a few seconds, and in general I prefer to eat it hot.  I just wish they can make less sweeter versions. 

 

 

 

 

 

Reply
ciccotelli
Posts: 362
(@ciccotelli)
Reputable Member
Joined: 11 months ago

I see Portuguese influence in Filipino cuisine, I don't think most Filipinos are aware of Portuguese cooking.   

Reply
5 Replies
Prau123
(@prau123)
Joined: 2 years ago

Prominent Member
Posts: 794

@ciccotelli

 

 

I recently viewed some Portuguese food and I would have easily mistaken them as Filipino dishes. The seafood, the meat, the desserts, the soups, and the layout is quite similar.  

 

Reply
ciccotelli
(@ciccotelli)
Joined: 11 months ago

Reputable Member
Posts: 362

@prau123

I am surprised most Filipinos are not aware of the similarities 

Reply
Prau123
(@prau123)
Joined: 2 years ago

Prominent Member
Posts: 794

@ciccotelli

 

Most Filipinos are not aware of Portuguese food.   

I'm familiar with the Portuguese longganiza and sausage.

 

 

 

Our neighboring country of East Timor was colonized by Portugal then later on the Dutch. The Portuguese people introduced Portuguese food such as Feijoada and others.  Portuguese also introduced international commerce and Roman Catholicism to the country.  

 

 

 

Feijoada dish in East Timor 

Feijoada

 

 

 

Reply
kay
 kay
(@kay)
Joined: 1 year ago

Reputable Member
Posts: 445

@ciccotelli

has portuguese influence Italian cooking too?

Reply
ciccotelli
(@ciccotelli)
Joined: 11 months ago

Reputable Member
Posts: 362

@kay

Yes we eat beef stew too 

Reply
Prau123
Posts: 794
(@prau123)
Prominent Member
Joined: 2 years ago

From Wikipedia's article on Cassava cake:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cassava_cake

 

Cassava cake is a traditional Filipino moist cake made from grated cassavacoconut milk, and condensed milk with a custard layer on top.

Additional toppings may be added before the second baking, like cheddar cheesemacapuno strings, or grated coconut, among others. It is further garnished with additional toppings like more grated cheese or latik.

Cassava was one of the crops imported from Latin America through the Manila galleons from at least the 16th century.[2][3] Cassava cake is a type of bibingka (traditional baked cakes), having its origins from adopting native recipes but using cassava instead of the traditional galapong (ground glutinous rice) batter.

 

Wikipedia does such a great job in describing the cassava cake.  What I didn't know before is that the cassava cake is a type of bibingka, but when you think about it, it does make sense, you're using cassava instead of glutinous rice, and the cassava can sometimes be served in a banana leaf much like a bibingka.  Both dishes have high moisture content and have a somewhat gooey texture, use coconut milk, and sometimes have coconut (or macapuno which is a type of coconut) strips inside them.  I also prefer to eat them hot or warm, although both dishes can be eaten cold. 

Cassava is often served at parties.  It's still a popular party dessert, and is one of the most featured party desserts from my experience.  There are many delicious Filipino desserts, but the cassava cake is often served and perhaps served more often than any other Filipino dessert.  It ranks up there with puto and kutsinta in terms of popularity.  In some Filipino parties, guests will bring a dish to contribute to the party (similar to a potluck gathering, except the host will still supply a large portion of the food if not the majority of it), and you'll sometimes see two or three cassava cakes from different guests and/or the host which is fine since that means there is more cassava cake to go around and different ones to try. 

Apart from the cassava cake, the only application I can think of offhand for the use of cassava in Philippine cuisine is tapioca pearls which are used in drinks such as sago't gulaman, and desserts such as binignit, bilo-bilo, and halo-halo, and also kurukod which is a type of suman.  I could be wrong, but I think the cassava is also added in some Filipino stews or soups.  I just can't find any names of any dishes that use them.  Beef stews in a sinigang style can sometimes have cassava in them from my recollection or perhaps I'm confusing it with gabi (taro).  

Reply
Page 3 / 3
Share: